Icecreams
August 13th, 2018 by Janine

The Tor and sheep’s poo

The stone of the Glastonbury Tor holds the sun’s warmth and shares it with my back.  I duck out of the wind, soak in the fabulous views of the Salisbury plains and reflect on the last year and half since diagnosis with Myeloma.  Deep breaths of fresh air (fused with sheep poo aroma) fill my lungs. I’m sure the menopause (Meno) conundrum has been one of the most challenging and inspiring learning elements of this cancer journey.  Are you ready for part three (and final for now) of the Menopause blogs? Let’s talk ‘alternative’ (read non-medical) Meno symptom management solutions and finally, my decision about what, if anything, to take.  It’s probably apt that I am writing this in a place full of people living ‘alternative’ lifestyles or certainly appearing to be very happily in their own world…

 

The Tor at Glastonbury

The Tor, Glastonbury

Sheep

Sheep

Previous posts about Menopause

If you are happening upon this blog and interested in Menopause and Menopause and Cancer please see my previous posts on Menopause (part 1 and 2, links under Recent posts on the righthand side of this page).  Now, let’s crack on with the next instalment, part 3, the alternatives to HRT. A rhyme? Unintentional!  Any poets out there? Maybe it’s time for Meno poetry.  I hear Menopause, The Musical and the comedians (Victoria Wood (rest in peace), Sandra TsingKathy BurkeAngela Verges, and Jeff Allen have and are doing a fine job); room for another genre? Hey, if it gets all of us talking Meno, I’m keen. All poetic contributions welcome!!!

 

Menopause, The Musical

Menopause, The Musical

 

Menopause (Meno) part three (my final Menopause focussed post for now)

Wee recap; my MMmM project (Multiple Myeloma and managing Menopause symptoms) began by exploring the traditional medical models, asking my oncology team and gynaecologists for advice.  I then turned to a wide range of menopause experts by experience and occupation for complementary, natural and alternatives to Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT).  I found myself falling into the world of Isoflavones, phytoestrogens, red clover black cohosh and more.  Here is what I discovered…

 

Alternatives to HRT

Actually before we get it into alternatives, let’s be clear, one completely valid option is to take nothing and embrace the menopause process as a natural part of aging; to cope with whatever symptoms are experienced.  However, for many of us, in the same way that managing difficult periods, pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) or tension (PMT), difficult pregnancy, endometriosis, polycystic ovaries, fibroids and other gynaecological processes and concerns, it is either unnecessary to put up with unwanted symptoms or they are simply intolerable.  Additional support is needed.

Below are some of the alternatives to HRT and practical solutions I encountered and many of which I have tried.  Please note most complementary and alternative treatment options do not yet have robust evidence of effectiveness; though some women will experience benefit from some of these treatments.1

 

Isoflavones and Phytoestrogen

 

The definitions and characteristics (interesting nutrition and hormone stuff);

Isoflavones are crystalline compounds whose derivatives occur in many plants (especially pulses), often as glycosides.  Phytoestrogens refer to a substance found in certain plants which can produce effects like that of the hormone oestrogen when ingested into the body.2

Isoflavones are oestrogenically potent phytoestrogens.  The main dietary isoflavones, called genistein and daidzein, are mostly found in legumes such as soy, chick peas, lentils and beans.  Lignans and prenylated flavonoids (also phytoestrogens) have potent oestrogenic activity but there are few studies about them. 2

 

Evidence is mixed about Soy

A recent study found a reduction in hot flushes when women used soy germ extract with 100mg of isoflavone glycosides.3  It is not clear from studies to date, whether frequent soy consumption explains the lower rate of hot flushes among different ethnic groups.

 

Red clover and Promensil

Red clover, another source of isoflavones, contains compounds that are metabolised to genistein and daidzein after consumption. The most studied red clover product is Promensil. 4

 

Promensil double strength

Promensil

 

  • A ‘natural’, non-medical, easily accessible, alternative to HRT
  • Growing evidence base that it works in improving unwanted Menopause symptoms
  • A three-month dosage duration is recommended initially
  • Not enough evidence yet looking at long term effects
  • Just like HRT, it is unlikely to work for everyone

 

Promensil and hot flushes

Managing women with phytoestrogens

Managing women with phytoestrogens

The evidence

There are few studies exploring Promensil and Isoflavones for the management of Menopause symptoms and other health benefits though fortunately the evidence base is slowly growing.

A recent review highlighted evidence supporting use of Promensil at 80 mg/day for treating hot flushes in menopausal women.  This finding was consistent across 3 studies included in the meta-analysis. Promensil was found to be safe over the short-term duration of the studies (3 months).5

A more comprehensive review with a rather unfortunate name ‘Managing women with phytoestrogens’ also reviewed the studies mentioned above. (It makes me angry when its implied or explicitly stated women need managing!!)  Setting this name issue aside, the researchers proposed that one of the most widely researched food supplements has been the phytoestrogenic preparation containing red clover isoflavones. Six randomised trials exploring the impact on vasomotor symptoms (night sweats, hot flashes, and flushes) were included, three of which displayed a significant benefit compared to placebo.6

Data from small randomised and observational trials showed benefits of using red clover isoflavones for osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Red clover isoflavones may also derive psychological benefits. Safety data is positive so far.  The reviewers conclude with further studies would be welcome, particularly in women with significant medical risks.6

A 2018 paper describes a study of 50 patients where a combination of 40mg dose of Isoflavone along with calcium, vitamin D and inulin improved vasomotor disturbances as well as quality of life and sexual function in menopausal women.  This was a small trial with a number of limitations so the results while promising, need further investigation.7

 

From the makers of Promensil (Check out their website and research claims)

Here are two sheets summarising clinical support for red clover Isoflavones relating to a range of health domains.

Clinical Support for Red Clover Isoflavones

Clinical Support for Red Clover Part1

Clinical Support for Red Clover Isoflavones Part2

Clinical Support for Red Clover Part2

They also explain the difference between Promensil and other red clover products including soy isofalvones.  Check it out here.

 

The controversy

There had to be some debate, right?  This is Menopause we’re talking about after all!  Studies involving Promensil were reviewed, analysed and reported in a 2014 Cochrane review paper. 4  Only five trials met the search criteria and the authors argue that,

No conclusive evidence shows that phytoestrogen supplements effectively reduce the frequency or severity of hot flushes and night sweats in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women.

On a positive note the same review highlights the possibility of a positive outcome from genistein and concludes

…benefits derived from concentrates of genistein should be further investigated.

Read the full paper here.

 

Other ‘Alternatives’, Complimentary Medicine and Lifestyle choices for managing Meno symptoms

Beyond the better known isoflavones, I came across a number of other recommendations for using supplements, making lifestyle changes and employing complimentary medicine for reducing unwanted Menopause symptoms and side effects.  I then went hunting for scientific evidence of each product’s effectiveness and began trying a few things out.  Here is a list of the alternatives I looked into:

  • Probiotics
  • Vitamins (A, C, D, E, K, Zinc)
  • Omega 3
  • Black Cohosh
  • Acupuncture
  • Chill Pillows (a new take on chill pill!).
  • Exercise
  • Chinese Medicine
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
  • Non-hormonal pharmaceutical treatments

Some women have found benefits from natural remedies BUT the research is mixed and caution is advised.  Check out these summaries; 1,8,9

Complimentary alternative therapies.

Natural remedies for hot flushes  

A paper Mallhi et al with a long list of alternatives, dosage and known side effects.

Here are my discoveries in more detail; I hope they prove useful…

 

 

Udos Super8 Probiotic
Probiotics and Vitamins

Now for a confession, I can’t remember exactly who told me to take probiotics and a full range of vitamin B’s, Calcium and Vitamin A, C,  D and Zinc to help with menopausal symptoms (blame it on Chemo and Menopause memory impact!).  I am 99% sure, I first heard this from my Nutrition therapist, then from the amazing lady who runs our local health shop and then finally I’m sure it came up in the interviews facilitated by Katie Phillips with Menopause experts that I have mentioned in my previous posts (See links below for some of the interviews and more about Katie).  I take VitD, VitB and Calcium daily as part of my Cancer treatment as advised by my medical team so it has not been a hardship to add the probiotic.

Muhleisen’s paper highlights probiotics for reinstating vaginal equilibrium in menopause 10 and Britton’s paper advocates probiotics to prevent vaginal dryness and atrophy.11 Count me in!

 

Omega 3

According to a recent review, Omega-3 supplements may alleviate night sweats but not hot flushes.12

 

Vitamin C, D, E – more mixed results

A 2013 paper highlighted that Vitamin C and E reduce the intensity and number of hot flashes via promotion of adrenal function though it is very important that the correct dosage is used and no large doses are taken.13

In contrast, LeBlanc’s 2015 paper and 2010 studies (by Dennehy et al and Lerchbaum et al ) show there is no evidence that vitamin D or E helps vasomotor symptoms but do recommend vitamin C, D, K and calcium for maintaining bone health.14,15,16

 

Zinc and Vitamin K

Zinc and Vitamin K are positively associated with bone mass however I couldn’t find any evidence for either reducing unwanted menopause symptoms.17,18, 19

 

For healthy hair during menopause – vitamin Bs, C, Proteins and Fats

Sugar craving during Menopause – check your Vitamin C levels

Consider going VEGAN or simply eat more plants! 

One study showed that vegans reported less bothersome vasomotor symptoms than omnivores.20

 

Vitamin A

I couldn’t find any relevant studies regarding Vitamin A and menopause and menopause symptoms.  Please let me know if you can!

 

Black Cohosh

While an older 2010 study found black cohosh reduced hot flushes21 a recent, more comprehensive Cochrane review concluded there is insufficient evidence to either support or oppose the use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms.22

 

Chinese Medicine, Dong Quai, Ginseng 

Another 2016 Cochrane review found insufficient evidence that Chinese herbal medicines were any more or less effective than placebo or HRT for the relief of night sweats and hot flushes.23

 

Non-hormonal pharmaceutical treatments (e.g. SSRIs often referred to as anti-depressants)

A 2010 review of studies found Clonidine, SSRIs and SNRIs, gabapentin and relaxation therapy showed a mild to moderate effect on reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer.24

 

fullsizeoutput 1490 225x300 - Isoflavones. Icecreams? No, for Menopause. What?

Chillmax pillow

Chillmax pillow

A Chillmax Pillow

This is a wonderful, wonderful recommendation (thank you Sis-in-law and Mum-in-law!!)  Slip it under your pillow case or lie it vertically down your pillow to provide your head and neck with a cool sensation.  Ahhh, bliss.

 

Acupuncture

Acupuncture may be beneficial in comparison to not taking anything though the evidence is weak at the moment.25

 

Regular exercise

Ha. We can never escape this one it seems.   While exercise isn’t directly linked to vasomotor symptoms of menopause including hot flushes it is recommended to support the related impact of Menopause changes and symptoms.  Check out these articles – A good time to exercise and Meno and constipation.26

 

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

There is growing evidence that CBT can help reduce the impact of Menopause symptoms.27  The British Menopause Society have released a helpful leaflet that has been endorsed by the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE).28

 

Alternatives to HRT and Cancer

A 2013 systematic review of soy and red clover as used by breast cancer patients or those at risk of breast cancer, found a lack of evidence showing harm from use of soy with respect to risk of breast cancer or recurrence. Soy intake in line with a traditional Japanese diet (2-3 servings daily, containing 25-50mg isoflavones) may be protective against breast cancer and recurrence. Soy does not increase circulating estradiol or affect estrogen-responsive target tissues. Prospective data of soy use in women taking tamoxifen does not indicate increased risk of breast cancer recurrence. Evidence on red clover is limited though existing studies propose that it may not possess breast cancer-promoting effects.29

A 2015 study proposed a combination of Soy and probiotics may have potential for reducing the risk of breast cancer.30

Another three-year study concluded that when compared to HRT, Promensil was safer as there was no effect on known breast cancer risk factor.31

New shoot amongst the dryness

New shoot amongst the dryness

 

Menopause, Sex and Vaginal Dryness

Let’s talk about sex baby, let’s talk about….sex.  Remember that track by Salt n Pepa? Except I’m talking about sex during Menopause.  Many women find sex painful due to vaginal dryness or don’t fancy sex at all as Meno creeps up on them.  Women – you do not have to put up with this state of affairs.  For dryness, there are medical issued and organic/natural products that can make a real difference.  Consider trying out Yes (mostly organic) or Sylk products. Here is a link to an article 32 which includes a comparison between multiple product options.  How Important is vaginal lubricant and moisturiser composition? If you are concerned that your vaginal dryness might be severe and not easily solved by a moisturising lubricant you may be interested in this presentation on Vulvovaginal Atrophy (VVA).  It has some great info on the moisturising lubricants too.33

 

Twice Two cups

Twice

Will I go through Meno twice?

One thing the gynaecologist did say is that I am very unlikely to have to go through Menopause twice; that is, it shouldn’t reverse once my chemo stops and start again at a later stage.  That seems like a kind gift from the Universe.  I’ll hang on to that.

Of course, I will still be part way through my own Meno journey, living with the uncertainty of not knowing whether mine will finish after 3 years, 7 years or be considerably longer lasting.  Hey, so long as the symptoms are managed and I continue to feel myself, I am happy and willing to embrace this new, wondrous, challenging and clever process, my body goes through.  Hopefully too, in a few months’ time, after being on my chosen treatment and monitoring symptoms, I will be much clearer about what is a Chemo or Cancer induced symptom versus a Menopause symptom.  Meno and hormones may no longer be a fall-back excuse for my ‘well aren’t I moody today’ moments!

So now to my decision:

For me, taking nothing is not an option at this stage as maintaining an even mood, improved libido and reducing hot flushes are a must.  Do I try Promensil and or trust in the gynaecologist who was adamant HRT was the way to go? I wonder what is holding me back.  I think it is my oncologist with the anti-HRT opinion that is still bothering me; I need to have another talk with him.

 

My Decision(s) and a U-turn

Talking and researching must stop at some stage and a decision be made.  Continued talking and researching can make decisions much harder to make; there will always be contrasting views and experiences.  A stake in the ground, a baseline, is needed.  I must make the decision that is right for me with the information I have today.  After all, I know any decision is not set in stone, I can change it later, if new information comes my way, or my body doesn’t like the solution I try or the decision stops feeling right to me.

So, what’s it to be?

I’m going to start natural plant based bioidentical HRT gel and progesterone tablets.

Except I’m not.  Deep Breath.

Just when I had decided to start natural plant based bioidentical HRT (I had even submitted the prescription) my Mum, my very precious, kind Mum, was diagnosed with breast cancer.  Deep breath.  I won’t talk about this now, other than to say, the all important public health system has once again appeared to have caught the little nasty early; thank you health teams, thank you Universe.

Now, with breast cancer in my family, my chances of getting secondary cancer (and breast cancer) seemed to have leapt from a statistic to a reality.  Another deep breath.  Talk to self; be sensible.  I let my med team know and asked for a mammogram and a chat with the breast cancer team.  My oncologist referred me immediately.

I had based my ‘go with HRT’ decision on two factors in the end: a) The delivery mechanism for the estrogen component is via gel and does not go directly through my liver and, b) the research investigating HRT side effects and long term effects is present and more robust than Promensil, at this stage.  Although now…

 

Out with HRT and in with Promensil

The HRT rational above was discarded considering the increased risk of secondary cancer and my recent family diagnosis.  Promensil now seemed much more appealing.  Despite the lack of larger and longitudinal studies, I decided Promensil was work the risk.  I needed help and I was being monitored extensively each week; if a negative impact occurred, I figured it would be picked up quickly and I could stop Promensil immediately.

Two other things helped me embrace this decision; it felt right as soon as I had made it (a better feeling than I ever had with HRT) and it fitted with the additional chat I had with my oncologist.  He knows me best, is a clinical lead and has spent most time with me over the last 15 months.  He has my best interests at heart and has always coped with my endless queries and requests for repeated explanations.  While I do trust the others in the haemo-oncology team, I gave weight to his opinion and his caution over adding this long-term medication into the mix. He said he felt HRT would add extra risk, risk that wasn’t able to have a statistic put on it due to my individual circumstances and the few studies exploring HRT and Myeloma relapse.

Finally, I am reminded that while I usually place my store in scientific evidence, just because something hasn’t been rigorously studied yet, doesn’t mean it won’t later be discovered to be beneficial.  Cannabis oil for chronic illness/pain and ketamine for some mental health disorders spring to mind, as substances we might have first thought of as harmful yet in certain doses and conditions, have been found to have positive outcomes.  Mindfulness didn’t start out with an evidence base, yet now, it is well established as having beneficial outcomes in many circumstances.

Therefore, I have taken the risk (whatever that is) of introducing yet another supplement/medication into my life.

 

Promensil 80mg Red Clover Isoflavones

Promensil 80mg Red Clover Isoflavones

Promensil = Improvement (my case study so far)

I started Promensil while conducting this research and then stopped when I thought I’d better gather the evidence first and make a more informed decision.  I was a bit reluctant to stop as I hadn’t noticed any adverse effects and there had seemed to be an improvement in Meno symptoms.  When I stopped, the night-sweats returned with a vengeance.

Promensil is shaping up to be a wonder product for me.  Although I am open to the possibility it is a placebo effect.  Now back on it, I have taken one pill, once per day, for six weeks (the double strength version).  Much to my delight the full body night-sweats with drenched bed linen and night clothes are no longer!!  I don’t remember having one in the last fortnight at all!  Plus, a lovely UK heat wave have meant nights have been hot (in the mid-20s Celsius/77 Fahrenheit at times).  The improvement timing couldn’t have been better, otherwise I think I would set the bed and house on fire or internally combusted!

 

Hot flashes

My daily hot flashes now tend to occur in the afternoon, rather than all through the afternoon and evening, are less severe and less frequent; down to 2 per day though I haven’t monitored closely. I do know I’m not stripping off clothes and putting them back on minutes later any near as often, not even every night.

For the last ten days, I have switched to taking Promensil around lunch time or a little later, as most hot flushes appeared in the afternoons or evenings, when they did occur.  I have discovered this has had a positive benefit too; flushes have reduced again and while I have not been taking a log, it seems I am only getting one flush a day now.

 

Other symptoms

The jury is out on other symptoms.  I seem to sleep slightly better, deeper while asleep though I still wake often.  I need to monitor the Meno symptoms closely at the end of each week and during my non-chemo week, to determine any changes; the chemo and steroids at the beginning of the week are likely to interfere with sleep (negatively) and energy (positively).  In the middle two weeks of the six on Promensil, I thought my mood had been slightly more even, though I need to check with Hubby on this; suspect he may disagree!

Over the last two weeks with so much going on, health, family and otherwise, I have exercised and meditated less, my mind has been very occupied and I think my mood has fluctuated a lot.  Feels like the Promensil was unlikely to have any positive impact on that symptom!  Though, who knows maybe my mood would have been worse, if I hadn’t taken it.  No science here, no objectivity, remember these are just observations, interpretations and surmising.  Though, I am the expert in my own body and mind so I’m rolling with a ‘Promensil is working’ concept for now.

On a couple of occasions, I’ve noticed if I drink a hot drink quickly or have a moment of frustration or stress, a hot flush followed very quickly.  I’ll keep an eye on this and try to notice if it always happens or appears random rather than linked to hot drinks and stress.  Though I believe this is not uncommon.  Check out these known triggers for hot flushes.

 

Menopause was hard to write about

I have found Menopause hard to write about. Maybe I hesitated because I wasn’t sure whether I was going through it or not: the symptoms are so like those that accompany cancer and chemo.  No, that wasn’t it really, I was embarrassed, at first.  Outside of my very close friends and eventually, close clinicians, I have found it one of the hardest subjects to raise.  I’m not sure why.  Especially when, I am a psychologist who believes in taking the unhelpful stigma out of, well, EVERYTHING.

Menopause has been more difficult to disclose than cancer: WEIRD. Talking about menopause with and due to cancer and chemo: DOUBLE WEIRD.  This combo takes Meno, ‘to another level’ (the catch phrase of 2017-18, I’m sure).    Talking about some aspects of Menopause have been harder than others; vaginal dryness for instance.  For some reason, I found this really hard to write/talk about.  Worried I’d be judged maybe?  Worried people would assume I was experiencing vaginal dryness and for some reason not wanting people to assume that everything I write about, happens to me?  Strange, given mostly it does, and the blog is of a personal nature.  But that’s the point isn’t it.  Get talking.  Reduce stigma.  There is nothing to be embarrassed or awkward about.  These processes are natural, they do not need to be hidden, talked about in secret or god forbid, suffered in silence.

I think underneath it all, I believe my and many European societies or so called developed countries with an individualistic tendency, associate women, during and post menopausal as old, unsexy, and past it.  I know that simply isn’t true.  Sophia Loren, Helen Mirren, my Mum, spring to mind – all sexy, awesome women, regardless of age.  Yet I worried and continue to worry about feeling and being: old, unsexy and past it, particularly when my skin gets thin and wrinkly from steroids and chemo, my grey hair becomes more abundant and my energy or libido feel low.  I worry when I stop feeling like myself.

All is not lost; applying psychology skills, and finding psychological flexibility, I constantly and consistently challenge these thoughts and feelings.  Though some days it is hard to do. I remind myself of a new more helpful perspective.  I take time to reflect, recognise and acknowledge that I haven’t felt old or unsexy every day or every moment of the day.  In fact, I have and do feel mighty fine, a lot of the time (another rhyme?).  Not bad for a woman fast approaching 50.

 

Menopause communities…have you found yours?

Thank goodness for the new wave of open discussion about Menopause and growing social communities like the Menopause Café movement.  It’s about time.  Here are two Meno stories and an episode of Loose Women about Meno.  You may also want to check out the magazine Menopause Matters.  I’m very grateful for Katie Phillips, her wonderful interviewees, the menopause café team, the celebs who have shared their stories (Kim Cattrall, Zoe Ball, Meg Matthews, Lorraine Kelly to name a few (see their and others’ stories here)  and the ordinary (spectacular) women in my life who have disclosed their menopause journeys to me.  Thanks for helping me get over my embarrassment by reminding me; I am not alone and that my Meno related decisions will be the right ones for me.

I have a lot of time for the author Christine Northrup with her interest and application of both her  medical and holistic complimentary health expertise.  Here is one of her books that you might find particularly useful.

Christine Northrup The Wisdom of Menopause

The Wisdom of Menopause

 

Your feedback

Please do share the link to this blog, ask any questions you may have and do let me know:

  • What has been the hardest part of your menopause or menopause with cancer journey?
  • What has been the hardest part of caring for someone going through menopause or menopause and cancer?
  • What have you discovered?
  • Your Meno poem
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Resources, References, Study papers and more:

Menopause, The Musical

https://www.ents24.com/uk/tour-dates/menopause-the-musical-touring

Communities: The Menopause Cafe

https://www.menopausecafe.net/

English Oxford Living Dictionary (August, 2018). 

Definition of isoflavones. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/isoflavone

Definition of phytoestrogen.  https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/phytoestrogen

Alternatives to HRT

Complimentary alternative therapies

https://www.womens-health-concern.org/help-and-advice/factsheets/complementaryalternative-therapies-menopausal-women/

Natural remedies for hot flashes – black cohosh, ginseng and more

https://www.menopause.org/for-women/menopauseflashes/menopause-symptoms-and-treatments/natural-remedies-for-hot-flashes

Mallhi, T. H., Khan, Y. H., Khan, A. H., Mahmood, Q., Khalid, S. H., & Saleem, M. (2018). Managing Hot Flushes in Menopausal Women: A Review. Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons–Pakistan: JCPSP28(6), 460-465.

https://www.jcpsp.pk/archive/2018/Jun2018/jcpsp-vol28-no6.pdf#page=48

Soy germ and isoflavones

Imhof, M., Gocan, A., Imhof, M., & Schmidt, M. (2018). Soy germ extract alleviates menopausal hot flushes: placebo-controlled double-blind trial. European journal of clinical nutrition, 1.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41430-018-0173-3

 

Support for Promensil

Promensil website

https://promensil.co.uk/

Myers, S. P., & Vigar, V. (2017). Effects of a standardised extract of Trifolium pratense (Promensil) at a dosage of 80 mg in the treatment of menopausal hot flushes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Phytomedicine24, 141-147.

Panay, N. (2011). Taking an integrated approach: managing women with phytoestrogens. Climacteric14(sup2), 2-7.

Controversy & Genistein

Lethaby  A, Marjoribanks  J, Kronenberg  F, Roberts  H, Eden  J, Brown  J. Phytoestrogens for menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD001395. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001395.pub4.

https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD001395.pub4/full

Vitamins, Black Cohosh and more

Vitamins in combination with Isoflavones –

Vitale, S. G., Caruso, S., Rapisarda, A. M. C., Cianci, S., & Cianci, A. (2018). Isoflavones, calcium, vitamin D and inulin improve quality of life, sexual function, body composition and metabolic parameters in menopausal women: result from a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Przeglad menopauzalny= Menopause review17(1), 32.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5925192/

Probiotics

10 Muhleisen, A. L., & Herbst-Kralovetz, M. M. (2016). Menopause and the vaginal microbiome. Maturitas91, 42-50.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378512216301244

11 Britton, R. A., Irwin, R., Quach, D., Schaefer, L., Zhang, J., Lee, T., … & McCabe, L. R. (2014). Probiotic L. reuteri treatment prevents bone loss in a menopausal ovariectomized mouse model. Journal of cellular physiology229(11), 1822-1830.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3994184/

Omega 3

12 Mohammady, M., Janani, L., Jahanfar, S., & Mousavi, M. S. (2018). Effect of omega-3 supplements on vasomotor symptoms in menopausal women: A systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030121151830335X

Vitamin C & E

Support for Vitamin C & E

13 Doshi, S. B., & Agarwal, A. (2013). The role of oxidative stress in menopause. Journal of mid-life health4(3), 140.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3952404/

No support for Vitamin E (Note – an older paper and findings may be outdated)

15 Dennehy, C., & Tsourounis, C. (2010). A review of select vitamins and minerals used by postmenopausal women. Maturitas, 66(4), 370-380.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20580500

Vitamin D

14 LeBlanc, E. S., Hedlin, H., Qin, F., Desai, M., Wactawski-Wende, J., Perrin, N., … & Stefanick, M. L. (2015). Calcium and vitamin D supplementation do not influence menopause-related symptoms: Results of the Women’s Health Initiative Trial. Maturitas81(3), 377-383.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378512215006477

16 Lerchbaum, E. (2014). Vitamin D and menopause—A narrative review. Maturitas79(1), 3-7.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378512214001996

Zinc

18 Kim, D. E., Cho, S. H., Park, H. M., & Chang, Y. K. (2016). Relationship between bone mineral density and dietary intake of β-carotene, vitamin C, zinc and vegetables in postmenopausal Korean women: a cross-sectional study. Journal of International Medical Research44(5), 1103-1114.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5536545/

Vitamin K

19 Jaghsi, S., Hammoud, T., & Haddad, S. (2018). Relation Between Circulating Vitamin K1 and Osteoporosis in the Lumbar Spine in Syrian Post-Menopausal Women. The open rheumatology journal12, 1.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5842378/

17 Kim, M. S., Kim, E. S., & Sohn, C. M. (2015). Dietary intake of vitamin K in relation to bone mineral density in Korea adults: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010–2011). Journal of clinical biochemistry and nutrition57(3), 223-227.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4639586/

 

Black Cohosh

21 N.B. Old study – Borrelli, F., & Ernst, E. (2010). Alternative and complementary therapies for the menopause. Maturitas66(4), 333-343.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378512210002197

22 Leach  MJ, Moore  V. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga spp.) for menopausal symptoms. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD007244. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007244.pub2.

https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD007244.pub2/full?highlightAbstract=menopause&highlightAbstract=menopaus

 

Acupuncture

25 Dodin  S, Blanchet  C, Marc  I, Ernst  E, Wu  T, Vaillancourt  C, Paquette  J, Maunsell  E. Acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD007410. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007410.pub2.

https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD007410.pub2/full?highlightAbstract=menopause&highlightAbstract=menopaus

Chinese Medicine

23 Zhu  X, Liew  Y, Liu  ZL. Chinese herbal medicine for menopausal symptoms. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2016, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD009023. DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009023.pub2.

https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD009023.pub2/full?highlightAbstract=menopause&highlightAbstract=menopaus

Non hormonal interventions e.g. SSRIs

24 Rada  G, Capurro  D, Pantoja  T, Corbalán  J, Moreno  G, Letelier  LM, Vera  C. Non‐hormonal interventions for hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD004923. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004923.pub2.

https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD004923.pub2/full?highlightAbstract=menopause&highlightAbstract=menopaus

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

28 British Menopause Society – CBT for Menopause Fact Sheet

https://thebms.org.uk/_wprs/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/BMSfactsheet-CBT-for-HCPs-FINAL.pdf

27 Stefanopoulou, E., & Grunfeld, E. A. (2017). Mind–body interventions for vasomotor symptoms in healthy menopausal women and breast cancer survivors. A systematic review. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology38(3), 210-225.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27832718

Vegan-Plant based diet

20 Beezhold, B., Radnitz, C., McGrath, R. E., & Feldman, A. (2018). Vegans report less bothersome vasomotor and physical menopausal symptoms than omnivores. Maturitas112, 12-17.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378512218300100

Exercise

26 Move Over Menopause – 5 reasons why this is the best time to exercise.

https://www.healthline.com/health/move-over-menopause-5-reasons-why-this-is-the-best-time-to-exercise#1

Alternatives to HRT and Cancer

29 Fritz H, Seely D, Flower G, Skidmore B, Fernandes R, Vadeboncoeur S, et al. (2013) Soy, Red Clover, and Isoflavones and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review. PLoS ONE 8(11): e81968. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0081968

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3842968/

30 Toi, M., Hirota, S., Tomotaki, A., Sato, N., Hozumi, Y., Anan, K., … & Ohno, S. (2013). Probiotic beverage with soy isoflavone consumption for breast cancer prevention: a case-control study. Current Nutrition & Food Science9(3), 194-200.

https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ben/cnf/2013/00000009/00000003/art00004

 

Use of Promensil in women with a family history of Breast Cancer

31 Atkinson, C., Warren, R. M., Sala, E., Dowsett, M., Dunning, A. M., Healey, C. S., … & Bingham, S. A. (2004). Red clover-derived isoflavones and mammographic breast density: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial [ISRCTN42940165]. Breast Cancer Research6(3), R170.

http://www.evaluategroup.com/Universal/View.aspx?type=Story&id=151835

Some of the interviews

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=katie+Phillips+menopause+week+of+interviews

Katie Phillips (facilitator of week of My Menopause – interviews with menopause experts)

https://theschoolofself.love/

Celebrity Meno Stories

https://rejuvage.com/9-celebrities-speak-out-menopause/

Menopause Magazine

https://menopausematters.co.uk/magazine/

Vaginal Dryness

Importance of vaginal lubricant and vaginal moisturiser (with helpful product comparison)

32 Edwards, D., & Panay, N. (2016). Treating vulvovaginal atrophy/genitourinary syndrome of menopause: how important is vaginal lubricant and moisturizer composition?. Climacteric19(2), 151-161.  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/13697137.2015.1124259#aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cudGFuZGZvbmxpbmUuY29tL2RvaS9wZGYvMTAuMzEwOS8xMzY5NzEzNy4yMDE1LjExMjQyNTk/bmVlZEFjY2Vzcz10cnVlQEBAMA==

Vulvovaginal Atrophy (VVA)

33 Treating vulvovaginal atrophy/genitourinary syndrome of menopause: Lubricants, Moiturizers and Vaginal DHEA.  Slides by Nick Panay, Imperial College London.

https://www.menopause.org/docs/default-source/agm/panay-n-2017-slides.pdf

 

Acknowledgements

Images: 

Unsplash:

Ice-creams – Mark Cruz -334535

Sheep – Sam Carter -191161

The Tor in Glastonbury – Hello I’m Nic -710394

New shoot amongst the dry – Stas Ovsky -632497

Two cups – Tom Crew -661269

Boy and microphone – Jason Rosewell -60014

 

Other images:

Four women – Menopause Musical – https://www.ents24.com/uk/tour-dates/menopause-the-musical-touring

Promensil picture 1 – me

Promensil picture 2 – https://promensil.co.uk/

Probiotics – me

Chillmax pillow – me

Article related pictures – me

Book – https://www.drnorthrup.com/

 

 

© 2018 Janine Hayward www.psychingoutcancer.com.  All rights reserved.

 

Posted in Menopause, Symptoms and Side Effects Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Steam and Shower
June 20th, 2018 by Janine

A fire has started at the bottom of my ribs.  It caught hold in an instant.  Creeping upwards, slowly at first but I know what’s coming…it’s picking up pace…then whoosh; my chest, head, face and whole body is washed with heat.  Fever type heat, taking over the lymph nodes, my forehead, my entire skin.  All my sweat glands are working overtime and can’t compete, they give up.  It’s a hot flush or flash and boy is it flashy.  It makes its presence known.

Now, I’m hot and wet.  Nup.  Not that kind.  The kind where you feel grubby, like you need a shower and a change of clothes.  The night sweats are the worst (well for heat), waking up absolutely drenched, the bed linen soaked and feeling too hot to sleep (if I had any in the first place) …and knowing it will happen again in 10 minutes or an hour (if I’m lucky).

The worst is when you get up, feel good, have a shower, do your makeup, still feel good and then while you are finishing off drying your hair or just as you leave the house or need to head for a train…. whoosh it happens again…. that good feeling a distance memory when frustration, feeling stinky and in need of a second shower takes over.  Decisions; go out sweaty or be late and have another shower.  Lovely.  Stinky wins most of the time.  I hate being late.  I feel like a woman of the Victorian age as I spray myself with perfume to cover up the body odour.

Mid-life crisis or Climacteric or ?

Speaking of ages and eras, I googled menopause and synonyms came up; maturity, mid-life crisis, climacteric, grand climacteric (no less), matureness, post maturity.  Mid-life crisis – what an unhelpful way to talk about menopause.  Though finally and slowly, Menopause is being talked about (mind you, we could do with a royal to take up the band wagon and bring it into the bright light).  Climacteric is an interesting one, apart from referring to Menopause in medical circles it also denotes a critical period or event and having extreme and far-reaching implications or results.  I got a shock when I discovered what some of these far-reaching implications were. Men, this is just one of the places where you come in!

Shock

Shock

In the week when I decided to research Menopause and Cancer the universe must have been aligning; three different sources of Menopause information happened into my path.  The first one; I turned on the radio and heard the presenter say a piece on Menopause was coming up.  Perfect timing.

Menopause; a completely natural process involving women’s bodies producing less oestrogen and changing progesterone hormone levels.  I’ll come back to the implications of these in part two of this blog.  For now, let me tell you about something I heard on the radio that shocked me.  The host talked of how she had discovered some high flying, dynamic women at the top of their career had left their jobs due to the difficulty they had experienced in managing the symptoms of menopause.

Shocked doesn’t really explain it.  In this day and age?  I didn’t doubt that the symptoms must have been horrendous; I was stunned that women were not being adequately supported by medicine or natural means to enable a normal physiological transition to be facilitated so that their lives and work were not impacted in such a significant way.  The feminist in me wondered if men would have put up with this state of affairs though to be reasonable, menopause appears to be a learning curve for many of us.  Consequently, I was shocked.

Divorce certificate

I was even more shocked when men joined the discussion and explained their relationships had broken down, divorce had resulted and they described their many regrets about not having understood what the women in their lives were going through during menopause.

Job loss, love loss.  OMG. Menopause, you can be incredibly cruel and we need to talk about you, a whole lot more.  Now!

Symptoms and Years

In my humble opinion, Menopause symptoms are sh*t:  mood swings, hot flushes, night sweats, brain fog, short term memory loss, difficulty in finding words and string sentences together, fatigue, low libido and vaginal dryness.  They often start when women are in their 40s and 50s though can start when women are much younger.

Symptoms often last YEARS.  Men, please note this.  YEARS not weeks or months.  Most women (8 out 101) face life impacting menopause symptoms for between 3 and 7 years and for some women, the rest of their lives.  On top of this, perimenopause (the few years before menopause starts) usually brings unhelpful, generally unwanted symptoms too including disrupted sleep, headaches and heavy periods.

Sleep vladislav muslakov 261627 unsplash 300x228 - Hot to Trot. NOT.  It’s Menopause.  Men, this is for you too.

Ok, not all women experience these symptoms so we must be careful of making assumptions however MOST women do find themselves having to go through yet another massive learning curve about their body. And guys, it would be great if you came along for the educational ride.  Not least because men go through a ‘pause’ of sorts too!

For men, it’s called andropause and refers to age-related changes in male hormone levels.  Male menopause (not necessarily a helpful term) involves a drop in testosterone production in men who are age 50 or older. It’s often affiliated with hypogonadism. Both conditions involve lowered testosterone levels and similar symptoms.

You’re getting on my wick…

Ha.  So we DO have an excuse for being irritable and bitchy.  Sort of…well, not really…because it’s not that helpful, is it?  Usually most of us just feel worse when we let irritation get the better of us and say or do something we wish we hadn’t said or done.  However, when we know hormones may be playing a big part in our mood we can use our awareness to catch ourselves in our irritation and then choose our words and actions carefully, with more sensitivity.  Not always easy but likely to result in a better day.  It’s also OK to acknowledge we are feeling easily irritated!!

The more we talk about menopause, the more men and women will be able to identify when peri-menopause and menopause start.  We can then learn about the options for managing the unhelpful symptoms.  Finally, both men and women can then practice and take responsibility for being supportive, tolerant and understanding of each other and ourselves as we go through these changes.  Maybe then, we’ll be able to avoid mountains from molehills and the extremes; relationship challenges and break down, negative outcomes for career and lifestyle.

Now imagine dealing with all of this…and cancer…and chemo.

Except, there’s more.

Identity

I wish it was just the symptoms listed above and the frequent embarrassment that accompanies them, that many women were dealing with.  Going through the menopause can play havoc with women’s sense of identity, sexiness, and value in the world.  Western society still predominantly relates to the menopause phase as women becoming old and somewhat invisible rather than being mature, loving and fully living life.

Edna M. Astbury-Ward summed it up well in her 2003 paper

The social construction of menopause as the entry point to old age may represent a challenging and difficult time, because while women may feel young, society tends to perceive them as rather less attractive and less fully functioning. This perception of menopause as a negative milestone is often found only in Western cultures. Medical culture also influences the meanings of middle and old age, particularly for women at the time of approaching menopause.

Cultural bias against ageing and sexuality has contributed to that stereotyping of older women as asexual. In general, the media has not served the ageing female well. Older men are often marketed as sexy, yet older women are rarely seen outside of advertisements for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and Conti knickers.2

I suspect we need a new, positive and helpful narrative for the completely natural yet often difficult to go through transition that is menopause. The recent menopause cafe phenomenon may be helping with this as a space is provided to discuss menopause and challenge stereotypes.³  Princess Anne, Duchess of Cambridge, Kate; Duchess of Sussex, Meghan – you don’t fancy taking up the band wagon, do you?

Chemo vs Menopause

This was the backdrop to my realisation that chemotherapy and menopause symptoms are eerily very similar.  I had been struggling to manage some of the chemo symptoms, particularly the lack of good quality sleep yet they may not have been chemo side effects at all (or at least not current side effects).

My next challenge along this cancer journey was now starkly obvious; to work out how best to support myself over the next year of treatment or to review treatment options, I needed to discern what was a chemo symptom and what was a menopause symptom and then learn how to address each in the best way for me.  In the back of my mind it also occurred to me that I may end up going through this whole process twice so getting a handle on it was crucial to enjoying my life and living it to the full.  Twice, because my menopause was possibly chemotherapy induced and not following its natural path.  I was yet to find out if there was a chance my symptoms would stop then start again once chemotherapy was complete (joy of joys).

There it was, a whirlpool of thoughts swirling around, when in the space of a few days, I turned on the radio at the right time, walked into a foetal medicine building to use the loo only to discover a medical exhibition on menopause and noticed a webinar series advertised on social media involving a week of interviews where experts in menopause shared their pearls of wisdom.

Timing and attention; thank you, Universe.

Part two coming up -– the nuggets from the Menopause experts and my oncologists’ stand-off!

I am going to take a breather now… oh, and another shower.

 

References

1https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/menopause/symptoms/

Astbury-Ward, E. (2003) ‘Menopause, sexuality and culture: Is there a universal experience? Sexual and Relationship Therapy’. Journal of the British Association for Sexual and Relationship Therapy. 18(4), 437-445

³ https://www.theguardian.com/society/menopause – Menopause café and challenging stereotypes about aging.

 

Acknowledgements

Images: Unsplash:

Steam_skyler-king-527288;

Shock_andre-guerra-676198;

Divorce_rawpixel-666933;

Sleep_vladislav-muslakov-261627

 

© 2018 Janine Hayward www.psychingoutcancer.com.  All rights reserved.

Posted in Menopause, Myeloma Treatment, Symptoms and Side Effects Tagged with: , , , , ,

para protein
December 6th, 2017 by Janine

What a year! I turned 48, I was diagnosed with cancer and I’ve completed 48 chemo sessions. I love the number 48; it seems so symmetrical to me (I love a bit of symmetry).  Now ‘48’ has a WHOLE new world of associations!

Warning…I have happy news, and, I’m going to talk about toilet rituals.

First, the rituals.  

This may seem very strange to those of you who have always been super careful about hygiene when using public loos.  In my defence, I have rarely worried about these things because my childhood in New Zealand was filled with non-traditional toilet arrangements. When you are fortunate enough to spend all day at the beach or walking in the bush or driving long stretches of deserted road or camping in remote sites you tend to get over yourself quite quickly about going to the loo wherever and however.

Doing your business quickly behind a tree, rock, or in a smelly long drop with minimal paper or alternatively leaves or seaweed, is not that unusual.  Worrying about being seen was always a bit more bothersome than worrying about bugs, microbes or possible infections!  The upshot is; I have never worried about using public loos, ‘catching anything’ or having to use disinfectant.  I just focussed on washing my hands well.

Waiotauru Hut bush toilet 225x300 - 48

Now that my immune system is compromised it’s another story completely….though maybe I’m being a bit anal? (pun intended)

In the Chemo Day Unit, patients are asked to ‘wipe the loo’ with anti-bacterial wipes before and after use.  I recently discovered I had developed a wee ritual…Take a wipe, clean toilet seat, fold dirty side in, use clean side to wipe toilet handle, tap, hand wash dispenser, door lock, door handle. Dispose of wipe in bin.  Use loo.  Wash and dry hands properly – you know the 8-10 step process (depending on the poster).  Take new wipe and clean toilet.  Goodness knows what bugs I could pick up if I didn’t do this; don’t tell me!

Anyway, this is a new ritual in my life and once again one that seems to consume a little more of my available time and life though hopefully is worth it.  It seems so, so far, as I have yet to pick up any major nasties despite lower immunity and chemotherapy for 9 months now.  This ritual has now made its way out of the hospital and into public conveniences.  AM I being anal?  I’ll let you be the judge!

fullsizeoutput 1124 300x209 - 48 fullsizeoutput 1125 300x201 - 48

My News

…is happy, positive and hope-FULL…I’m very grateful for it and its effect; a reaffirmation of my faith in my medical team, the drugs and my health and life choices.  The Myeloma presence in my body has decreased further in the last few months… It’s down to 1 g/l (42 g/l at its peak) and a may be yet to plateau.  Yee ha!  Not only that, the serum kappa light chain results are 1.75 mg/l, backing up this great news and described as  ‘excellent’ by Dr L.  On top of that my liver is doing well. My Hb (Haemoglobin, the protein found in the red blood cells that carries oxygen around) level is back up to 121 g/l so I no longer need to consider taking EPO (yes, the cheaty cyclists’ drug of choice! I’m a tad disappointed.  I had wanted to experience how energised I’d feel!) While 121 g/l is lower than the desired normal levels (125 g/l plus) it is great for someone with Myeloma. My kidneys are also doing OK for someone with Myeloma, my Creatinine is 69 umol/L and normal level for women is approx. 45 -90 umol/L (I think; there seems to be some debate!).  Lots of good, great news, here. Dr L delivered these details and then reminded me to keep drinking 2-3 litres of water today for kidney care.  I imagined my kidneys; bloated, water-logged, bean-shaped balloons, wrapped up in clouds of cotton wool, floating about, relaxed and without a worry in the world.

fullsizeoutput 1127 300x224 - 48 fullsizeoutput 1126 300x192 - 48

I’ve had yet another bone marrow biopsy and pet scan (what effect does three doses of radioactive sugar chasing gunk in a year have on one’s body? I guess I’ll find out!).  I have an ear numbing full body MRI coming up in a fortnight.

Let’s hope they show (or don’t show lesions at all) that lesions are further dissolved and there are no new uninvited guests!!

What a year.

48.

One number I’ll never forget.

 

Acknowledgements

Images: Me (graphs va KCH), Long Drop – Sarang (public domain use permission granted)

 

© 2017 Janine Hayward www.psychingoutcancer.com.  All rights reserved.

Posted in Chemotherapy for Myeloma, Myeloma Treatment, Results Tagged with: , , , , ,

July 5th, 2017 by Janine

It may not be very British but I’m going to talk about money.  When this Myeloma journey started, my hubby and I immediately obsessed and worried about money, about what a cancer diagnosis could do to us, and how much treatment would cost.   I was disappointed, ashamed and annoyed to discover my NZ life term insurance had recently expired. It had always been a comfort to me that if anything had happened to me, Mum and Dad would get some money which would at least cover any unforeseen expenses such as Mum and Dad coming over for a funeral, funeral costs etc…but no, I let it expire without reviewing it….and the NZ insurance company who had happily taken my money each year had failed to update their systems with my new contact details, ensuring I didn’t receive any notifications of impending expiry.  They don’t offer that type of insurance anymore and so to renew, instead of paying an affordable sum, I would have to pay upwards of six times the amount for less coverage, and the fee would increase annually.  This would only be an option, of course, if I could get past the health questionnaire. Here’s the first thing, that turned out to be costly.

Next, and we put our hands up, it was our fault, after having health insurance for over ten years, we had just gained quotes for renewal and then decided to defer paying for a new policy for a few months.  We surmised, incorrectly, that we were fit and healthy; it could wait until hubby had changed job as health insurance often came in the salary package.  If he hadn’t secured the job he wanted within three months, we would take out a separate policy.  Murphy’s law, cancer turned up in our lives, within the first month of the period with no cover.  We felt embarrassed, upset and kicked ourselves that we had taken this risk; it hit hubby hard.  He felt guilt and worry that he may not be able to provide me the treatment and care experience that he wanted for me, without private health insurance options. That wasn’t necessarily the case but we didn’t know that at the time; he felt awful.

I was worried about money and treatment experience, and I knew, we had made the health insurance deferral decision for what seemed the right reason and sound risk assessment at the time; it was, what it was. There was no point worrying about it now.  As it turned out, with all things weighed up (including the cost of self-funding; a minimum of £15,000 per month for approximately two years and that did not include stem cell harvest and transplant procedures), I more than likely would have chosen the NHS trial route anyway (or maybe this is choice bias at work?!) and so this decision would have had minimal impact.

The hidden cost, has turned up when I have tried to get health insurance post diagnosis (you know, for all the things that can happen to me health wise that are not about cancer); not a simple or affordable task by any means.  If you have had or are living with cancer, many insurers simply won’t insure you.  Too bad, if I get hit by a car crossing the road and break my leg (nothing to do with cancer). This is yet to be resolved.  Thank goodness, the NHS is usually fab in emergencies.

More costs turned up, and this was all before getting to day to day living costs that seemed to have quadrupled since cancer arrived.  I had just finished a doctorate and as many readers now know, we had planned the trip of a life time with friends to meet in Canada for skiing.  A wonderful luxury, saved for and highly anticipated; a fitting reward for all our hard graft over the previous five years.  First our flights had to be changed and a new flight purchased, some accommodation and car rental costs forfeited and new ones incurred all to ensure I was back in time for treatment.  Next the company we had paid for travel insurance with, over the previous 15 years and with whom I had never claimed, cancelled our policy on hearing of my diagnosis – not just my policy but hubby’s as well!

Trying to find travel insurance when you are newly diagnosed with cancer is not easy.  Only a few insurers do it, they ask a whole heap of very personal questions (that I had never anticipated having to answer) but that is not the kicker.  The kicker is that instead of paying £120 for a comprehensive travel policy that includes all the sports, the cheapest policy I could find was well over five times as much and gave me considerably less cover.  Nice!  A real, kick you when you are down, moment.  For a few minutes, to myself, I cried and threw my toys out of the pram; how dare they? Don’t they know this situation is hard enough? My holiday has been spoilt. I’ve got cancer! They’re exploiting me.  They know I don’t have a choice but to pay their charge or not go on holiday, how cruel can they be? Bast***ds’Why was I being kicked while down and discriminated against? Obviously, I am not meant to travel when I am living with cancer or recovering, I am contaminated and meant to stay at home, rest and be quiet.  Expensive, that’s what it is.  I felt hurt and upset. Apart from the cancer, I was well, managing my treatment well and doing everything I could to ensure I would not need to go to hospital or need any extra meds while away (hell, I was even away with a medical expert) yet I was still required to pay a crazy amount for travel insurance.  In the end, I paid, putting quality of life over money.  I know I was lucky to be able to do this (see post Elk-ibou on the corner of Fox and Cougar).

Health insurance is expensive and hard to get.  Travel insurance is expensive and hard to get.  What next?  Everything.  Living with cancer, everything has seemed more expensive.  If it hasn’t cost extra, it has usually meant I have had to trade off not incurring an expense with doing/buying something that may be helpful or healthier for me.  The books I’ve bought about Cancer and how to survive; the organic food, supplements, the nutrition appointments all to ensure I was doing the best I could do for my body; weekends away that I booked because I worried I would become too ill to travel, anywhere; the glass containers I bought which were ‘safer’ than the plastic we’d lived with for years, the cleaning products I bought to eventually swap out with the brands I was used to buying, the bees wrap instead of cling film, the natural instead of usual skin care, all to avoid harmful toxins, parabens, BPAs and the like; the nutri-bullet and extra cups for the plant food smoothies, the non-dairy milks that are more expensive than milk because I’ve been advised to avoid dairy food for a while; the new clothes, I didn’t want to waste money on but had to buy because my clothes were dropping off my new plant food/chemo’d1 frame; the new, old car (plus insurance, MOT, resident parking permit) that we bought in case I became too ill to get to hospital appointments but had been managing perfectly well without, ‘before cancer’…these have all been costs we would not have had this year or ever, if I hadn’t received my news of Myeloma. If I keep thinking about this topic, there are other costs too but I’ll stop here before this list becomes overwhelming.

Many of these costs may appear non-essential; if there is limited income and children to feed and support, I understand how many people living with cancer may not spend or even have the money to spend on books, blenders and the like.  And there it is…the big question, how much does the ability to afford these changes, impact outcomes of; overcoming cancer, managing treatment or at the very least, living the highest quality of life possible?

What a horrible situation to be in, a horrible choice to have to make (if there is a choice, and for a parent particularly); asking themselves, do I spend the money on things that may help me overcome cancer or stay as well as possible, for as long as possible or do I forgo those expenses because we don’t have the money for them or because I don’t want to spend the money spent on me, when there are kids to provide for?  In my case, with no kids to consider, I found myself also thinking, I don’t want to waste money because Si still has a life to lead after I’m gone.  We have built our assets together so why should we spend all the assets we have on my treatment needs/quality of life preferences now, only for his life after me to be significantly worse off, financially?  It’s his life, his money, too.

Ok, so costs are up, some through choice and some through imposition by others.  Then there is the whole matter of income.  Would working be feasible while getting treatment and was I entitled to any income support?  I’d just applied for two great part-time roles to go with the independent projects I was working on. I put the applications on hold.  The weekly schedule of hospital appointments, blood tests and Chemo didn’t seem to leave room for work.  Working as I had planned to work, seemed impossible.  Not knowing how I would cope with Chemo and how much rest I would need also made it difficult to commit to a new job.  I didn’t want to let others down and I would need flexibility.  I’m not sure I would have hired me in those circumstances.

Costs have gone up and kicker number two; earnings have come down, crashing down.  I know some people work while receiving treatment, through preference for the distraction or normality of working.  Some people work because they must.  Others can’t work through being too ill and rely on income support through disability or illness.  The overall equation is simple; less income in, new costs and normal costs doubling, mean less money overall, fewer choices and for most people, more stress and pressure, right at a time when resilience, calm and mental strength are needed.

How do people living with cancer cope? How can I cope?  Even the idea that I would need to consider income support played with my sense of self, sense of standing on my own two feet, being independent, contributing and not being a burden.  Yes, I know, I can hear some advice now, the support is there for these kind of times, when unforeseen circumstances hit, you’ve paid your taxes for twenty years, you’re entitled to support, take it.  It still irks and I’m working through what I can and can’t claim, how much I can and can’t work, whether work is helpful or unhelpful, an option financially or not.

There has been a wee light at the beginning of this cancer cost journey; the small critical illness insurance I did have, was paid out within 10 days without quibble.  I am forever grateful for this, for one insurance company’s sensitive, rapid handling of my claim.  They made sure they didn’t add any more stress to a very stressful period of wrapping my head around diagnosis, the very opposite response of the travel insurer.

The challenge now is to turn this wee bit of money into considerably more money and find the time, amongst all the treatment, for this whole other project – changing our finances for our new circumstances.  I feel so awful for my husband in all of this; he didn’t sign up for his quality of life to be diminished, his wife to be ill and more pressure on him to earn and yet simultaneously be with me at treatments and consultations.  We certainly hadn’t included hospitals and medications and thoughts about selling our home, in the design of our near future.  Yet, I know in so many ways we are lucky and many people don’t have choices financially or otherwise, in the way that I do, we do.  Though sometimes I don’t feel very lucky.

Cancer costs; not just emotionally, physically, spiritually, intimately – it costs financially, in all sorts of directions, I couldn’t have anticipated and know that I am yet to encounter.  I’m not yet facing that scary prospect of needing an experimental drug not yet available in the UK or a trip to the USA for a new type of Car-T cell treatment or new transplant.  Those do not bear thinking about right now.

Talking about money is hard; it is so often a contentious topic or a trigger for stress.  People often have very different views about money and very different relationships with money.  It can be hard to find agreement with the ones we love about how money should be earned, spent, saved and valued and that is when life is going well. When illness strikes or circumstances change, it becomes even more important to set aside any fear, vulnerability and embarrassment arising when talking about money.  I recommend taking a deep breath and just start talking about it, in a matter of fact manner; your financial mistakes, lessons learned, fears and hopes. One hope I have is that this post helps others talk and listen to conversation about money in a compassionate and non-judgemental way.  In cancer journeys, along with other life journeys, agreeing how to move forward financially is important and warrants open honesty.  This will help money worries and any negative impact on recovery and treatment outcomes for the person living with cancer and their loved ones to be minimised.

 

1Chemo’d (my new word, do you like it? Or I could just say ‘fried’ but I like Chemo’d better, more self-explanatory I hope)

 

Acknowledgements:

Editing: Isobel S

 

© 2017 Janine Hayward www.psychingoutcancer.com.  All rights reserved.

 

Posted in Finance and Cost, Psychology for Cancer Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

May 8th, 2017 by Janine

J 281x300 - Why Me? Changing My Terrain.

Causes, Choices, Control and Change.

Now that I have circumnavigated the first two months of treatment, with a focus on doing what had to be done, I notice the question of ‘Why Me?’ popping into my head more often. I think about causes, choices, control, and change.  What caused my Myeloma?  Why Myeloma and not another cancer? Did my past choices cause my Cancer?  What can I control now?  How do I keep control?  What should I change about myself? What should I change about my lifestyle?  If I make changes, will my prognosis be the same?  Will changes really make a difference?  Or will I just think changes make a difference?  Will I create false hope?  If I make a bunch of changes and my cancer gets worse, or remission is short or only the same as every other person with Myeloma, will I feel cheated, get depressed, wish I’d just carried on as normal and not changed anything?  Are thinking about causes, control, changes and choices like a mouse going down a tunnel with no cheese?  Which are illusions, which are realities?

Ultimately, the question I was asking myself was: “Should I change my terrain?”

The main areas of terrain I was considering were:

  • Nutrition
  • Chemicals/Toxins
  • Mobile Phone / Technology
  • Mindfulness and Meditation

Why the focus on these areas of terrain? 

I was considering these areas as they made sense to me as possible areas for change.  The science, while not based on randomised control trials, is compelling and pointed out in an easy-to-read book called Anti-Cancer, a new way of life by Dr David Servan-Schreiber (who also had cancer).

After all, it is unlikely that there will ever be large swathes of money on offer for randomised control trials (RCTs) about Nutrition for Cancer when Big Pharmaceutical companies are competing for the same pot of money for their new drug… or when the findings from Nutrition trials may potentially show there is no longer a need for an existing drug that makes someone a whole lot of profit right now.

Don’t get me wrong, I am very grateful for Big Pharma, their RCTs and their drugs; they are helping me to kick Myeloma into remission.  I am however, a strong advocate for a holistic approach; an informed meld between medical and non-medical models, especially as the West learns to give more open consideration to healing and health strategies that have been used by non-Western cultures for centuries.

Particularly too, as while Cancer effects people of all ages and socio-economic status, it appears to predominantly be…drum roll… a first world country problem. Why is it that the rates of Cancer are very high in some countries (France, Denmark, USA, New Zealand and UK) in comparison to other countries (Japan, India, Oman).  Why is it that more developed countries fair worse than less developed? 268 cases of cancer were diagnosed per 100,000 in more developed regions, compared to 148 in less developed regions in 2012, with an exception being the non-melanoma skin cancer rates which were higher for less developed countries.  Why do other countries have crazily high rates of people with major illnesses other than cancer, such as heart disease (Turkey, Russia)?

Although diagnosis and recording systems availability and accuracy may influence data, could it be that certain types of stress, food, individualistic societies or combinations of these are also having an impact on cancer rates?

‘Why Me?’

I indulged my ‘Why Me?’ for a short time and asked: “Was it because I had chronic stress for years?” Was it because, before changing career, I had worked in contracts for telcos and banks, with constant tight deadlines, crazy commutes (5 hours a day at one stage) and a feeling of always having too much work and never getting it done?  I wondered, did I get cancer because I’d lived on coffee for years, eaten too much chocolate, cake, biscuits, drunk too much alcohol during my twenties (and thirties)?  Or was it because I was too analytical, too ‘in my head’, ‘too something’?  Was this my path, my destiny?  Was I meant to learn something?  Be something from this experience?  Did I even believe in paths, fate, non-fate?….and so like any normal human ‘bean’, I dwelt for a little while and still do occasionally.  And, this IS a tunnel with no cheese.  This conversation with myself, doesn’t serve me.  I don’t hang out there for long.

A reality.

We (me, my medical team, the fatalists and non-fatalists in my life) don’t really know the answer to Why Me?  When I asked the medical team, if anything I had done, used or consumed, caused the Myeloma, they insisted there is no evidence for links between my list and people getting Myeloma.  I rattled off: stressful jobs; caffeine and alcohol; supplements; skin potions and lotions; whacky, at the time, spa treatments; and, multiple surgeries (involving though not exclusively, three knee and a number of IVF related invasions).

It may be something I’ve done or something I haven’t done, something about my biological make up, my vulnerabilities, the years of chronic stress, the coffee or lack of coffee (I went without for a year) or some very specific combination of some, or all of these, in very specific amounts of severity, for a specific duration.  Are you noticing the complexity of ‘cause’ here?  No one really knows and no one may ever know.  There may be some amazing medical breakthrough in two years, 4 months and 6 days, when someone is studying finger surgery and discovers something new about Myeloma, that then leads to a randomised control trial or DNA discovery that may indicate some possible cause of Myeloma.

Let’s face it – right now, what we know is, Myeloma strikes at random and in general, men over 70 years old seem to get struck a little more than most. Until such time, as some crazy discovery is discovered, there isn’t much point me thinking about ‘Why Me’?

Yet…..

I can’t help thinking, if I don’t change something about: how I was living, what I was putting into my body and, how I was thinking, I’ll invite the status quo or a repeat performance.  That is, won’t I be inviting Myeloma to return once it is in remission, if I don’t change the terrain in which it developed, ran amok and was diagnosed?   This is the possible illusion as today’s reality (medical knowledge) indicates Myeloma always ultimately returns and people living with Myeloma eventually stop responding to treatment (drugs and transplants).  However, making changes and choices, help a person to feel in control of their day to day or to feel they have some control over their illness: another illusion? Possibly…but….

What if changing my terrain works?

If I changed my terrain and it didn’t change my prognosis or my response to treatment, I would be disappointed but at least I’d know, I had done the best I could.  No regrets.  Or would I think, sh*t I should have just had chocolate fudge cake whenever I felt like it, three coffees a day (and thrown in margaritas and champagne regularly) because it probably didn’t make a blind bit of difference?!

Regret?

But what if it did work?  What if I changed my terrain: changed my nutrition; removed my mobile phone from the bedroom; replaced my cleaning products with eco friendly, less toxic ones; used only ‘safe plastic’ or glass to store food; changed my skin care products to chemical free, natural ones; and practiced mindfulness and meditated regularly? What if, after all of these changes my response rate to Chemotherapy was excellent and my remission period was longer than average.  Wouldn’t the choices, changes and exerted control be worth it?!  SO, what choice do I have, really? How will I know what difference change makes, without making change?  If I don’t make all the changes, all at once, don’t I risk missing out on gaining the full benefit, if there is a benefit to be gained?

Causes, Choices, Control and Change – both illusions and realities.

I don’t know the cause of Myeloma.  I don’t know if my past choices had any influence over whether I got Myeloma or not.  I don’t know if my present and future choices will influence how my Myeloma treatment, prognosis and experience will play out.  The only thing I do know, is that I can choose to change and making changes may help me to feel in control.  Taking control and making changes may have a positive impact on my lifetime outcome and my experience of the cancer journey or at the very least it may help me to feel some semblance of lack of regret.

Psychology – Choices.

What I also know (though it can be easy to forget this) is that I can always choose to review my choices regularly and change them.  No one is stuck with a choice.  It might feel like it yet we make dozens of choices every minute of the day – which direction in which to move, what to say, to eat or not eat if we have food, where to look.  We can keep choosing even about the big-ticket items in our life.  Just because we take one path doesn’t mean we can’t, pause, reflect, review and make another choice or reaffirm the choice we have made.

For example, each day for the last six weeks, I chose not to have coffee.  Now, I’m going to get one, and savour it. You might say, well if you were a smoker trying to quit smoking, a choice of having one cigarette may be a poor choice.  I might choose to agree.  Alternatively, I might choose another tack and say that the smoker trying to give up who finds his/herself having one cigarette, could choose to not ‘beat their-self up over it’; they could choose to recommit to their goal of giving up and choose in each minute, to not have a cigarette.  Better yet, they could also choose to make a positive healthy, non-cigarette involving choice, about what to do and where to place their attention.  In other words, I would encourage positive choices that serve them and their goals.

Now relate this to Chemo and Changing My Terrain.  Two months ago, I chose to start Chemo.  Tomorrow, I might choose to stop.  I could. I might.  Right now, I have reviewed my choice and I am happy with my choice to do Chemo and be in a clinical trial.  It doesn’t mean I can’t choose differently tomorrow, if I so wish.  Let’s take a breather now; more about choices and attention later.  Hmmmm, smell that coffee.

coffee 300x200 - Why Me? Changing My Terrain.

 

Acknowledgements:

World Cancer Research Fund International

http://www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-facts-figures/data-cancer-frequency-country

http://www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-facts-figures/comparing-more-less-developed-countries

World Health Organisation

http://www.who.int/nmh/countries/en/

Editorial help (any errors are solely my own): Simon Hayward and Belinda Marment

Illustration: Sapphire Weerakone

 

© 2017 Janine Hayward www.psychingoutcancer.com.  All rights reserved.

Posted in Myeloma Treatment, Nutrition for Cancer, Psychology for Cancer Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

April 24th, 2017 by Janine

Aside from the Chemo, my body has consumed at least 534 medications and 825 supplements in the last 50 days….1359 pills in all.

I visited a well know artist with a gallery in South London.  I tried to have an open mind but still came away not liking the art!

I did discover the gallery has an interesting cafe based on a pharmacy (and one of the artist’s famous pieces) with an array of pills show cased all over the walls.  If I post pics of all of my pills do you think he’ll come after me for plagiarism?!

My average day….

IMG 1765 300x225 - Over 1000 in 50 days

I’m officially a pill popper!

 

 

Posted in Myeloma Treatment, Nutrition for Cancer Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Couch angelo pantazis 237143 unsplash - Treatment – We need to know NOW.
February 20th, 2017 by Janine

Most people take more time over choosing a new sofa or hairstyle than I was given to decide on my treatment pathway for Myeloma Cancer.  There was no time to waste; my back vertebrae were in danger of fracturing and causing cord compression so treatment needed to start asap.  I seal my fate within the week, a time frame Dr R and I could live with.  I frantically researched global treatment options versus UK treatment options, NHS versus private care, compared treatment side effects, managed queries in phone calls with Dr R in the evenings, spoke to experts, trawled the internet and discussed pros and cons lists with Simon.

I had a flash of realisation that no one could make this choice except me.  All the other big choices in life recently had been joint decisions; which house to buy, whether to move to Cambridge, when to move back to London, whether we could afford for me to start a business, whether to get a cat, how each clinical psychology course could work for us if I was offered a place.  Joint decisions, because they impacted both of us.

Yet, here was the decision that could turn both of our lives completely upside down and I ultimately had to make it alone. A decision impacting my health, my body and what I was going to let someone else do to it. What if I chose the wrong thing and I shortened my life unnecessarily?  What if I chose something that turned out to have gruesome side effects for me?  What burden was my choice going to cause for Simon?  How long will it be before I am in excruciating pain, breaking bones left, right and centre, paralysed or need full time care?

Pause, breath.  I remind myself that survival rates in myeloma are increasing at one of the fastest paces among all cancer types in the UK1. Pause. Breath.

In the end four things kept zooming around my head:

  1. There is some evidence (though better and more research is needed) that people have better outcomes when they participate in clinical trials2,3.
  2. Standard care involves Thalidomide. I know it has improved since the old days but the side effects can still be nasty and I just don’t like the sound of it.
  3. The main trial drug Carfilzomib has had great results for people at relapse stage and it and its side kick Cyclophosphamide have been much better tolerated than Thalidomide.
  4. I will be monitored like a hawk if I sign up to the trial so reactions and adjustments are likely to be more timely.
  5. I can always withdraw if I feel the trial is no longer serving me and move to standard care. I don’t want to withdraw yet I can, if I feel it’s necessary.

You guessed it, in the end I chose the trial.  It’s called CARDAMON and is being overseen by a partnership between University College London (UCL), Cancer Research UK and Amgen Ltd (Pharmaceutical company).  Participant recruitment is taking place at UCL and Kings College Hospital (KCH) and several other UK hospitals.

So, what will be done to my body and its overzealous Myeloma para proteins?

For four months, in one month cycles, I will receive a chemotherapy cocktail of three drugs nicknamed KCD.  KCD comprises of:

Carfilzomib (Kyprolis)4,5.  This has been used to treat over 4000 myeloma patients world-wide with both relapsed and newly diagnosed myeloma, is licensed for use in the US and approved by the Food and Drug administration (FDA) but is yet to be approved in the UK, hence the trial.  It is a proteasome inhibitor that prevents breakdown of abnormal proteins in cancer cells, causing the cells to die.  It has only rarely been reported to be linked with the side effect of peripheral neuropathy (pins/needles/numbness in extremities) which can be painful and which has been associated with the drug used in standard care, Velcade (Bortezomib).  I will get Carfilzomib by intravenous infusion, through a cannula in my vein on 6 days out of the month.  Doesn’t sound so bad…

Cyclophosphamide (Cyclo)6.   This drug belongs to a group of drugs called alkylating agents. It works by sticking to one of the cancer cell’s DNA strands. DNA is the genetic code that is in the heart of all animal and plant cells. It controls everything the cell does. The cell cannot then divide into 2 new cells.  I will get Cyclo orally by tablets on 3 days out of the month.  Doesn’t sound so bad…

Dexamethasone (Dex)7.  This is a strong steroid that can suppress inflammation and the immune response, kills cancer cells and usually induces a better response to the other chemotherapy drugs than when chemotherapy is used alone.  I will get Dex orally by tablets on 4 days out of the month.  Doesn’t sound so bad…

After three weeks in the month of going into hospital every Monday and Tuesday for the above, I get a week off the KCD and don’t have to go to hospital.

I do though have to take a bunch of other meds too, one to protect my kidneys, another to prevent/manage nausea, another to stop a virus outbreak, an antibiotic to prevent infection.  These continue during the non-chemo, no-hospital week.

I’ll also start another drug called Zometa8, a biophosphanate with good evidence that it reduces bone loss, fractures and helps to build bones. I will get Zometa by intravenous infusion, through a cannula in my vein on the same day as getting Carfilzomib I think.  I’m yet to understand how often this happens.

After four months, my response to the Chemo will be assessed and if my Myeloma para protein level has dropped by 50% or more, the Chemo will be considered a success.

I will then be scheduled for a heavy-duty med to induce stem cell production ahead of stem cell collection.

After recovering from the stem cell harvest, I will then be randomised to either the;

  • branch of the trial that receives an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT; meaning using my own harvested cells) in the same way I would have received one if I had chosen standard care or
  • I will go into the branch that receives a further four months of the KCD cocktail

After this, participants in both branches of the trial receive maintenance medication.

So, what is hoped for from all this medication?  Short term, the hope is that the standard care response of a minimum of a three-year remission is achieved and for the patients in the continued KCD arm that this remission period is achieved without having to undergo an invasive stem cell transplant.  Longer term, the aim is that the treatments, even within the three years of my own remission, will have moved on so quickly (there are already exciting drugs coming down the line in trials) that Myeloma moves from an incurable illness to a chronic illness. A stem cell transplant would then become the final defense at the later stages of the illness.

If this all a lot to take in, I get it.  I thought so too and I’m still getting my head around it all.  There is a massive new language set that goes with moving in this world of cancer and Myeloma.

Have I done the right thing?  I hope so.  I feel that I have, with the research and time in which I had to make the decision.  Psychological cognitive science theory purports that usually you will choose your choice.  It is called choicesupportive bias or post-purchase rationalization9.  It is the tendency to retroactively ascribe positive attributes to an option one has selected and it’s a cognitive bias.  Therefore, I am highly likely to have a cognitive bias about my decision to choose the trial because not to do so would undermine my choice…and make it much harder to believe the trial treatment will be successful.  I usually try to avoid or at least be cognisant to my own biases.  In this case, I fully own and embrace my bias about my decision to go with CARDAMON.  BRING IT ON!

 

Acknowledgements and References:

1Myeloma UK. www.myelomauk.org

2 https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article/22/Suppl_7/vii10/214151/How-may-clinical-research-improve-healthcare

3 https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article/22/Suppl_7/vii2/214043/The-impact-of-the-process-of-clinical-research-on

4 CARDAMON Patient Information Sheet; Kings College Hospital; version 4.0; 07Nov16

5 https://www.themmrf.org/multiple-myeloma-knowledge-center/myeloma-drugs-guide/kyprolis/

6 http://www.myelomabeacon.com/resources/2008/10/15/cyclophosphamide/

7 http://www.myelomabeacon.com/resources/2008/10/15/dexamethasone/

8 http://www.myelomabeacon.com/news/2010/06/22/zometa-increases-overall-survival-and-slows-bone-disease-in-multiple-myeloma-patients-asco-2010/

9 http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/choice-supportive_bias.htm

Copy Editor: Stephanie Kemp

Image: Photo by Angelo Pantazis on Unsplash

 

© 2017 Janine Hayward www.psychingoutcancer.com.  All rights reserved.

Posted in Chemotherapy for Myeloma, Psychology for Cancer Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,