Category: Cancer in my family

rave joel amissa 1184564 unsplash - Hedgehogs at a rave
May 29th, 2019 by Janine

Peripheral neuropathy. A fancy pants way of saying pins and needles. Except it is a bit more than that and the more, is scary. When tingling on the soles of my feet and in my hands turned to prickles and cried out for attention, I had just started my 14th cycle of chemo.  At night, as if hedgehogs at a rave, the prickles began dancing around, keeping me awake. My self congratulation for having coped well so far and immense gratitude to my body now seemed a little premature or at least to have jinxed me.  A strange oscillation between numbness and pain set in. At first, it came and went so I wasn’t too worried. I kept up the once a week, Maintenance Chemo.

Pain

The pain got worse. The tingling turned to a sharp micro needle feeling and the ache crawled up my left arm.  I remember thinking, this isn’t good. I started talking to hubby about wondering whether the benefits of chemo still outweighed the side effects. We decided they did. I kept going.

So, did the sensation and the pain. The cannula insertion became excruciating. The drip of the drug into my forearm was ok but by the end of the treatment the whole arm throbbed; I hadn’t had that before. In the days in between chemo, the pain, numbness and needling rollercoaster, deepened and didn’t let up. I felt increasingly fatigued, distracted and unable to concentrate.  Pain will do that. The symptoms eased a little if I did nothing and stopped using my hands altogether. Have you tried that? It is nigh on impossible! My weekends became slow, sedentary, dull; low mood came a calling.

Peripheral neuropathy doesn’t like hands

Then it hit me; the way I hold a pen had changed.  The length of time I could hold a hairdryer and the way I used a hair brush had changed.  Whenever a cap needed to come off a bottle, I now ask for help. I was using two hands to open doors or press flush buttons on toilets. Cooking had virtually stopped (and I had thought I was being lazy) instead  lifting chopping boards, holding pans, taking roasting dishes out of the oven were difficult. I no longer enjoyed being in the kitchen. No wonder I’d started avoiding it. Hubby rattled off a list of other things I’d stopped doing or was doing differently.

I felt exhausted just thinking about it. Should I stop treatment? Should I keep going? Would I lose the use of my hands if I continued with chemo? What would life be like if I couldn’t use my hands? If the pain was too much? Was I being a wimp? I’m on a clinical trial, I signed the forms, I committed to it; could I simply stop? What would happen to me if I did stop? Would my cancer flare? Was chemo worth it? Was chemo making things worse? How do I decide whether to continue something that may extend my life, when it seems to be significantly reducing, the quality of the life, I have left? My brain; the whizzing and often unhelpful thought production machine, joined the rave.

Holding pattern

I told my oncologists what we had noticed about the difficulty using my hands and how I was questioning whether to stay on the trial; questioning whether more chemo was the best thing for me.  They ran a few tests and determined I had lost strength in my hands, especially my left hand. They recommended I defer chemo for a week.

That week came and went with no improvement.  I went into a holding pattern for another week. Peripheral neuropathy is the pits and as well as dancing needles it feels like being burnt, a searing. The pain was constant, in my shoulder, my forearm and using my hands made everything worse. More MRIs were ordered. I started to worry about new lesions. Was it peripheral neuropathy? Would it get worse? Was it something else?

Deal or no deal

It came down to one week and the limit of missed weeks allowed when on the trial. I had happily missed a few weeks of treatment to be with Mum during part of her radiotherapy and then missed additional weeks while we waited to see if the pain and hand function would improve. We now had to decide, the medical team, hubby and I, the best next step for the one remaining week; chemo or no chemo. Sounds like deal or no deal except there was no money involved, no windfall or good luck, instead hope or no hope. Bones versus hands.

Hands milada vigerova 45368 unsplash 300x204 - Hedgehogs at a rave

Hands won. Living rather than life, won. This time.  Drs L and A recommended I stop chemo; they didn’t want my hands to get worse and so I was kicked off the trial.

After 21 months, 17 cycles of chemo, virtually weekly blood withdrawal, 100 odd cannula insertions…it was time to give the body a break.

Care as Usual

I went off the trial and on to ‘care as usual’. What I didn’t factor in, was that meant I would no longer be looked after by the trial team, the team that had had my back from the beginning, the team I had come to know, feel safe with, could express my fears and questions to and laugh with. I would be losing the team that had been with me since March 2017 when I first stepped into the Chemo Day Unit and steeled myself for the uncertainty of cancer treatment. Sigh.

Then of course there were the dominos. The other life challenges, falling thick and fast. Not sure what I mean? See my last post, Silent Dominos.

So while still dealing with Mum’s recovery and ‘what next’ (she’s amazing by the way) and my peripheral neuropathy and hand malfunction… along came the next three dominos:

  • Changing treatment, care team and feeling cast out into a new uncertain hospital process
  • Dad’s Melanoma came back
  • My cancer got worse

Who on earth had it in for my family?  Who had we unintentionally, unwittingly, annoyed?

All of us with cancer. At the same time.

We didn’t deserve this. No one does.  I needed to remind myself:

Cancer doesn’t care who you are or what you have or haven’t done.  It’s simply not that choosy.

Hedgehog tadeusz lakota 473808 unsplash 300x225 - Hedgehogs at a rave

Posted in Cancer in my family, Chemotherapy for Myeloma, Myeloma Treatment, Pain, peripheral neuropathy, Symptoms and Side Effects Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Silence
April 5th, 2019 by Janine

Hello you. Is anybody out there? Sorry I have been so silent for so long; it’s been a heck of a hard eight months. That’s not to say there haven’t been some good times, some great times, times I’ve felt adventurous, happy, even peaceful. There have though, been times when I’ve thought this is just too much. Too much everything. I may have been giving this blog the silent treatment, yet in my head, I have written so many, many, times. 

If any one thing had happened, gone wrong, been challenging; I would have been able to cope. Life doesn’t work that way, though, does it? One thing happens, then another, and while I get my head around those, another and another, like multiple, side by side dominos tracks; they all cascade, one by one and at the same time – bang, bang, bang. 

After about the third bang…my ability to do the helpful, healthy things went out of the window. I fell of the tracks… I struggled to get back on. For a week, I managed it, then I fell off again. I picked myself up, recommitted but only for a day … and then I …gave up.

Sugar, alcohol, copious amounts of coffee, long periods of not eating, then eating crap, withdrawal, duvet days, not wanting to socialise, wanting to be on the couch with TV and the cat…all re-entered my life with a vengeance. I was no longer walking the psychologist and cancer care talk.

Except I couldn’t escape the knowing. I knew what was happening. I watched it happen. I watched everything I’d built up to support me, over the previous year since diagnosis, slip away.  Despite this, somehow, I was still managing to function, to help others, to turn up at the cancer centre and be the psychologist, I knew myself to be.  The cost was high. Exhaustion kicked in. Overwhelm. Then the next domino fell, and the next and another. 

So, I fell off the tracks and self-care plans. I stopped walking my talk. Out went the green smoothies and in came caffeine and Pisco sours. I was in cope, any way I could, mode. 

Turns out I am very, very, human after all. Who knew? 

And the dominos…Well, one you already know about, if you caught my last two blogs,
Isoflavones and Tears on a plane

The others were a shock to me, maybe to you too.

The first set;

1. My hands stopped working.

2. Mum got cancer.

3. An internet troll joined my party.

I’m not silent anymore.

dominos marco lermer 1406710 unsplash 300x200 - Silent Dominos

Posted in Cancer in my family, Psychology for Cancer, Symptoms and Side Effects, Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , ,

tears plane morre christophe 121633 unsplash - Tears on a plane
December 18th, 2018 by Janine

Saying goodbye to anyone you love is tough. Saying goodbye to my parents is very very tough. It hits me differently every time.I’m not a call every day girl or live close by girl and never have been; maybe this is the downside of our family’s emphasis on resilience and independence? Anyway, it just worked out like that.

My parents aren’t call every day people either.  I never know what I’d say, for one thing.  I always knew I’d travel, then I landed overseas and didn’t come back, except for visits.
Childhood in one country, adulthood in another.

Saying goodbye is never easy. It’s even harder when life’s curve balls keep coming.

Cancer is part of our family and my parents are super brave.  Now, we are all, the diagnosed, the treated or being treated and the monitored.  We are all now carers of people living with cancer.  For my liking, we are far too familiar with hospitals and their machinations.  Being with Mum and Dad during a small part of Mum’s big C journey, seeing her handle it with courage and honesty has been a mix of scary, reassuring, and inspiring.

Strange, how living with cancer is both normal because it’s so common yet abnormal because it demands a new normal to be created…and ultimately accepted. A new normal for carers as well as patients.  Treatment disrupts lifestyles either temporarily or forever more.  Scans and check ups creep into lives like tax bills; always there in the diary, we know they are coming and we don’t really want to think about them or the possibility of having to pay more.  Isn’t getting cancer in the first place, enough?

Worries, thoughts, about relapse or recurrence, hover around.  They are set aside for short bursts of positivity and focus on the important things, before appearing like a politician, front and centre, even if there is nothing new to say.

Saying goodbye is never easy.

Though I wouldn’t mind, if it was GOODBYE CANCER.

Acknowledgements

Images: Unsplash pics:Plane window–morre-christophe-121633

© 2018 Janine Hayward www.psychingoutcancer.com.  All rights reserved.

Posted in Cancer in my family Tagged with: , , , , , ,